In government, one of the most difficult challenges for an incoming department head or policymaker isn’t the mountain of life-altering decisions; it’s the process — the institutionalized, bureaucratic decision-making process that favors inaction, fractured focus, and a disposition to inertia.

Philosophically speaking, our system of government is very much designed this way.  Practically speaking however, the rapidly changing nature of technology is outpacing the public sector’s ability to keep up with newer, more efficient ways to deliver citizen services.  Mobility in government is the prominent technological trend as it represents not just another avenue of interaction, but an entire world where a large and growing portion of our society lives, works, and plays.

So, what’s a strong tech-savvy policymaker or a CIO looking to get the most out of government to do? He or she might wish to institute enterprise level management techniques.  However, given the natural inertia and stove piping of various agencies and departments, the challenge can often be overwhelming.  That is especially true for moving into our ever-mobilizing world.

Governing magazine, in conjunction with AT&T, recently conducted a survey of public sector leaders at all levels of state and local government. The Creating and Implementing a Holistic Mobile Strategy guide found that 50% of respondents don’t have an enterprise level mobility strategy, even though 58% of respondents have developed or will deploy at least one new mobile application in the next two years, most likely for a basic financial services, such as tax payments, tag fees, or driver’s license renewal.  It is indeed a mobile world, and our public sector leaders are caught between a rock and hard place, struggling between ignoring mobility and moving ahead too quickly without proper planning, resources and technical expertise.

 

 

Check out the guide for insights from AT&T technology experts, public sector leaders and Governing magazine on issues like managing the BYOD trend, mobile device security, ever-popular application development practice procedures, and case studies.

Share with me: what kinds of service do you wish were available online?  How does your local government do at bringing services to you?  What lessons can be learned from the private sector and how do our elected leaders and their appointees put best practices into place?