Educators and policy makers continue to debate whether mobile technology and 1:1 learning initiatives, whether in the form of devices provided by the school or those brought by students from home, can be a valuable teaching tool.  Parents say yes!

Exciting survey results

A new study reveals that more than half of parents surveyed believe schools should make increased use of mobile devices in education, and 32 percent agree they should be required in schools.

In one of the most comprehensive studies of its kind, new research from Grunwald Associates and the Learning First Alliance finds that parents are taking note of the positive effect technology has on their kids. Seventy-one percent of parents say mobile devices open up learning opportunities, while 62 percent say the devices benefit student learning.

Parents are taking action

While educators and policy makers go back-and-forth on the issue, parents aren’t waiting around.  Forty-five percent say they plan to buy – or have already purchased – a mobile device to support their child’s learning.

Click here to view an expanded version of the infographic.

Now is the time

With a majority of parents on board, now is the time for education administrators, teachers, and policy makers to join forces to shape the future of education. If you agree with parents who support mobile learning, here are three simple things you can do to help –

1. Be a partner.

Mobile learning approaches and platforms are still evolving, so it’s helpful to provide good (and bad) feedback. Parents and teachers should work together to figure out what works (and what doesn’t) in classrooms and at home.

2. Find and share good apps.

For every educational app, there are tons of entertainment apps that are vying for kid’s attention. So when you find a good learning app, share it – with educators and parents alike.

3. Voice your opinion.

If you see value in mobile learning, let people know. School administrators and policy makers are making important decisions about support for these innovative programs, and need to hear success stories and public encouragement.

At the end of the day, mobile learning programs are still uncharted territory for many parents and teachers.  But as this new research proves, family support for these valuable initiatives is there.  Now everyone just has to work together to make more of them happen!

For more information about The Living and Learning with Mobile Devices Study, visit http://www.corp.att.com/edu/docs/mobile_kids.pdf.

Are you a parent?  What’s your personal view of mobile learning? Do you think the results of this survey are on the mark?